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Diabesity: Diabetes + Obesity


Diabesity: The 21st Century Pandemic

Obesity is the #1 cause of Type 2 Diabetes which is accounts for 90-95% of the 26 million people who have Diabetes.  It is estimated that 80% of people with Type 2 are obese or overweight.

According to the CDC:

8 of 10 Americans over the age of 25 are overweight. 58 million Americans are overweight, 40 million are Obese and 3 Million are morbidly Obese. Over two-thirds of adults in the United States are overweight or obese, and over one-third are obese, according to data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003–2006 and 2007–2008.

Children:  Data from the NHANES survey (2003–2006) indicate that approximately 12.4 percent of children age 2 to 5 and 17 percent of children age 6 to 11 were overweight.***About 17.6 percent of adolescents (age 12 to 19) were overweight in 2003–2006.

Cost:  On average, people who are considered obese pay $1,429 (42 percent) more in health care costs than normal-weight individuals.

Cost of obesity by insurance status for each obese beneficiary:

  • Medicare pays $1,723 more than it pays for normal-weight beneficiaries.  
  • Medicaid pays $1,021 more than it pays for normal-weight beneficiaries.
  • Private insurers pay $1,140 more than they pay for normal-weight beneficiaries.
Cost of obesity by the type of service provided for each obese patient:
  • Medicare pays $95 more for an inpatient service, $693 more for a non-inpatient service, and $608 more for prescription drugs in comparison with normal-weight patients.
  • Medicaid pays $213 more for an inpatient service, $175 more for a non-inpatient service, and $230 more for prescription drugs in comparison with normal-weight patients.
  • Private insurers pay $443 more for an inpatient service, $398 more for a non-inpatient service, and $284 more for prescription drugs in comparison with normal-weight patients.

To learn more about diabetes courses, click on the course name below: 
Diabetes: An Introduction
Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion for the School Nurse
Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion in Long Term Care (CSII)

Guest blog written by Judy Gilman, NP-R, RN, CDE. Judy has authored multiple Pedagogy Education courses. 

After an enjoyable 13 years working as a registered nurse in positions ranging from staff nurse to director of nursing services, Judy Gilman returned to school and received her family nurse practitioner credentials. Her passion in nursing has always been to help people who have diabetes, and she continued that passion as a family nurse practitioner. It first led to becoming certified as a Diabetes Educator and then founding the first two nationally-recognized Diabetes Education Programs in Montana.

Judy has served on various boards that influence the care of people with diabetes. She is proud to be a published author in The Diabetes Educator and Diabetes Care journals. Her most satisfying accomplishments, other than the privilege of caring for so many special people who have diabetes, has been receiving recognition by her peers in the Montana Chapter of the American Diabetes Association and the Montana Diabetes Project (a state subgroup of the CDC) and founding her own company, LIV-A-BETES™ (let’s take the ‘di’ out of diabetes).




Posted: 8/9/2013 4:52:54 PM
Comments
Comments
Sandra Keck
If Americans have such problems with obesity why not help them out, make it a priority in giving them what they really need, such as classes on cooking properly, excercising, and how to make it a life change. There are so many pills on to loose weight that do not work, why not come up with something that will work. There are many different kinds of people with these needs, have the insurance companys add this so it doesn't cost so much.
8/13/2013 9:13:48 AM

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